Yes, America, There is a Santa Claus
By: Amy Lutz

In 1897, a young girl named Virginia wrote a letter to The New York Sun, asking if Santa Claus did in fact exist. Newsman Francis Pharcellus Church responded with a now-famous editorial entitled “Yes, Virginia, There is a Santa Claus.” Virginia worried, since she had neither seen Santa Claus nor did she possess tangible proof of his existence, that the jolly man was not real. Francis Church reminded Virginia, and all of us, that seeing is not believing. We must first have faith and believe in the existence of Santa Claus’ spirit of generosity and love before we witness it in action. One hundred and fourteen years after the letter was printed, many of us find ourselves empathizing with little Virginia. How can things like love and generosity exist when the world seems so dark?Millions of people find themselves out of work, trying to make ends meet. Political bickering halts any hope at forward progress. Even talk of Christmas has been largely eradicated from public discourse. How could a figure as loving and generous as Santa Claus exist in such a seemingly hopeless world? Perhaps, like Virginia, we all need to be reminded once again of his existence. 
Please read more at The College Conservative
 
 
Charlie Brown to Conservatives: Look Past Society’s Aluminum Christmas Trees
By: Amy Lutz

In the classic film, A Charlie Brown Christmas, the story opens with Charlie Brown questioning his own feelings of depression over the Yuletide season. The season is meant to bring joy, but all Charlie feels is emptiness. Therefore, he embarks upon a quest to find the true meaning of Christmas. Charlie Brown soon finds out that the reason for the season does not come from sparkly baubles or aluminum Christmas trees, but rather in something much deeper and more meaningful. After his blanket-toting best friend Linus recounts the story of Christ’s birth in Luke 2:8-14, Charlie Brown discovers (in the words of another well-known Christmas figure) that “Christmas doesn’t come from a store, maybe Christmas perhaps means a little bit more.”  Charlie and his friends had gotten caught up in the commercialization and secularization of the holiday and; therefore, temporarily disregarded the story of the Nativity of our Lord. Don’t get me wrong, I love Santa Claus and Rudolf just as much as the next person, but I too find myself getting a bit caught up in the materialism of the season. 
Please read more at The College Conservative