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By: Amy Lutz

Congratulations, young America, you’ve reached the threshold of academic perfection. Recent studies have shown that an “A” is now the most common grade for college students in the United States. It’s nice to know that my generation is so well educated. Or perhaps not. Based upon a mountain of contradictory evidence and the environment I see all around me as an American college student, I hesitate to declare victory too soon. When you dig deeper the facts show that grade inflation is what really fuels our college students’ higher GPAs, and A today might be equivalent to a C forty years ago.

Despite the outward appearances of academic perfection, today’s students are not on an upward trajectory toward academic success. Last year, a USA Today report showed that college students make little academic progress in their first two years of college. In fact, 45 percent of students showed no significant gains, a figure which contradicts academia’s goal of educating students. College Students are more likely to focus on their social lives rather than their academic record. Professors caught up with their own research are less likely to pay attention to such habits. Additionally, students spend 50 percent less time studying now than they have in past decades. Fifty percent of students also said that they had never taken a class in which they wrote more than 20 pages in a semester. Good study habits must be developed early through hard work and challenging courses for academic success to be achievable. Even though grades may superficially be rising, good academic habits which produce long term success are lacking among today’s college students.

Please read more at The Blaze

 
 
College Conservatives Must Embrace the Importance of Action, Not Apathy
By: Amy Lutz

In recent years conservative college students have made headlines exposing the liberal indoctrination that runs rampant on college campuses. Many students have been subjected to an inaccurate, liberalized history curriculum while others have experienced the social rejection faced when “outing yourself” as a conservative. Personally, I’ve experienced the entire spectrum. From the Facebook taunts and eye rolls of my peers to a B+ I received on a theology paper for daring to quote Ronald Reagan, I’ve seen it all. By now, combating liberal indoctrination is a core concern of a majority of politically concerned conservative college students. While this may seem challenging to some, I contend that the increasingly liberalized collegiate culture is simply a manifestation of another issue: apathy. 

Please read more at The Blaze
 
 
If This Is How We #FixYoungAmerica, Then We’re All Doomed
By: Amy Lutz

I hate to break it to you, fellow college students and young people, but I think we’re all doomed. Well, perhaps not, but that was my first impression when I opened my email inbox on Monday of last week. All too often, I briefly glance through my email account and unless an email superficially looks important, I delete it. However, last week, I was quite disturbed when something caught my eye in an email from the National Society of Collegiate Scholars. 


Please read more at The College Conservative
 
 
My Experiences with Indoctrination
By: Amy Lutz

When I applied to colleges my senior year of high school, I got lost in the vast array available. Did I want a small school or large school? How much was I willing to pay for tuition? For months, I struggled to find the answers to these questions. Yet, no matter how many questions I had to answer, I knew one thing: I did not want to end up committing to a school whose ideology leaned far to the Left. However, in March of 2009, I settled upon St. Louis University.  Don’t get me wrong, I love my school and would choose SLU again if I had the chance, but its liberal atmosphere is a far cry from the conservative utopia I envisioned during my final weeks at Maur Hill Mount Academy. 

Please read more at The College Conservative
 
 
I Was Conservative Before it was Cool
By: Amy Lutz

A recent NPR blog titled “The Hipsterification of America” detailed the growing dominance of the “hipster” movement in modern America. Hipster culture, a movement contingent upon anti-trends and passive nonchalance, has always intrinsically been described as a “counter-culture,” and a liberal one at that. Anti-mainstream thought and behavior is inherent in the subculture and can be described as the heart of the movement. However, no matter how aggressively modern-day hipsters deny it, their movement no longer exists on the fringes of society. Hipster attire and media have become popular, which is ironically the opposite of the movement’s claimed status of a “counter-culture.” Hipsters are anti-establishment, anti-mainstream by nature, but their influence can now be seen everywhere, from popular television shows like New Girl to fashion trends such as thick glasses and skinny jeans. Hipsters are especially dominant on college campuses where liberal professors and left-leaning students alike embrace the subculture’s aims, attitudes, and attire. The increasing influence of hipster culture in academia and university life; however, begs the question: Who’s the counter-culture?  Now that the politically liberal attitudes of the hipster movement have become engrained into college life, who is left in the minority? Well, that’s easy: we are. Conservative college students have now been relegated to “counter-culture” status as the liberal aspects of hipster culture rise to the majority. 
Read more at The College Conservative